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The Call Or Rather The Necessity For AI Regulation?



Artificial Intelligence (AI) has become a buzzword once more in recent months, and it has been portrayed as both a savior and a destroyer of humanity. Many have expressed their concerns about the potential for AI to take over our jobs, control our lives, and, ultimately, take away our humanity. However, the real threat to our humanity is not AI itself but rather how we as humans develop, use, and regulate it.

AI is not inherently dangerous or malevolent. It is a tool that is supposed to help humanity progress, assist us, care for each other, and make our lives easier. As humans, it is up to us to determine what we develop with it and how we use it. The problem is that we have a long, dreadful, and criminal history of using our own bread, race, and interests to exploit each other and the environment. AI is just another tool that can be used to perpetuate this exploitation.

As an AI thought leader and global citizen, one of the biggest threats I see to our humanity is the potential for AI to be used to perpetuate existing inequalities. As a society, we already have significant disparities in wealth, power, and access to resources. If we allow AI to be developed and used in a way that reinforces these inequalities, then we risk exacerbating them further. For example, AI-powered hiring algorithms may discriminate against certain groups of people, making it even harder for them to find employment. Similarly, facial recognition technology could be used to target and monitor certain communities, leading to further oppression and marginalization.

The threat of AI is not limited to just reinforcing existing inequalities. It also has the potential to be used as a tool of oppression and control. For example, AI-powered surveillance systems could be used to monitor and control populations, while autonomous weapons could be developed to carry out military actions without human intervention. These scenarios could lead to a loss of individual freedom, privacy, and autonomy.

Despite these potential risks, it is important to recognize that AI is not the problem. The real threat to our humanity is ourselves, the humans developing and using AI. If we allow greed, selfishness, and short-term thinking to guide our development and use of AI, then we risk using it in ways that harm others and ourselves.



To prevent this from happening, we need worldwide regulations to ensure that AI is developed and used in a way that is ethical, transparent, and aligned with our values as a society. This means that we need to prioritize the development of AI designed to serve humanity, not exploit it. We must also hold those who develop and use AI accountable for their actions.

Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, is a well-known advocate for the regulation of AI development and use. He has warned about the potential dangers of AI and has called for regulation to ensure that it is developed and used in a way that is safe and aligned with our values as a society. In 2018, he stated, "AI is the rare case where I think we need to be proactive in regulation instead of reactive because if we're reactive in AI regulation, it's too late." I completely agree with Elon. The stakes are too high to be just reactive.

Musk's concerns about AI are not unfounded. Numerous examples of AI have been developed and used in ways that harm society. For example, facial recognition technology has been used to monitor and control certain populations, while AI-powered hiring algorithms have been found to discriminate against certain groups of people. Autonomous weapons have also been developed, which could carry out military actions without human intervention.

However, it is important to note that there are also positive examples of regulated AI use. For example, AI is being used to develop more accurate medical diagnoses, to predict natural disasters, and to improve energy efficiency. These examples demonstrate that AI can be a powerful tool for good when developed and used responsibly and ethically.

We also many positive examples of regulated AI use. AI is being used to develop more accurate medical diagnoses, to predict natural disasters, and to improve energy efficiency. These examples demonstrate that AI can be a powerful tool for good when developed and used responsibly and ethically.


To ensure that AI remains a tool for progress, not a threat to our humanity, we need worldwide regulations that prioritize the development of AI designed to serve humanity, not exploit it. We must also hold those who develop and use AI accountable for their actions.

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in the European Union and the Algorithmic Accountability Act in the United States are two regulatory frameworks that aim to ensure that AI is developed and used responsibly and ethically.

The GDPR regulates the collection and use of personal data to protect individual's privacy rights, while the Algorithmic Accountability Act requires companies to conduct impact assessments before deploying AI systems that could affect significant decisions and to ensure that their AI systems are transparent, explainable, and free from bias.

In conclusion, AI is neither inherently good nor bad. It is a tool that can be used for progress or harm, depending on how we develop and use it. While there are certainly risks associated with AI development and use, regulation can help to mitigate these risks and ensure that AI is developed and used in a responsible and ethical manner. By regulating AI development and use in our businesses and lives, we can ensure that AI remains a powerful tool for good and progress rather than a threat to our humanity.

Please feel free to share your thoughts and insights in the comment section.


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